PDF Version

NEWS RELEASE
For More Information Contact: Gary Ruskin (202) 588-7746
For Immediate Release: May 2nd, 2001

Sell the Naming Rights to Your Suits, Councilman

Following San Diego City Councilman Brian Maienschein’s proposal to sell naming rights to the city’s 26-block downtown ballpark district, Commercial Alert suggested that the councilman sell naming rights to his business suits to save taxpayers the money from his salary.

Under Councilman Maienchiein’s proposal, the city would sell the name of the neighborhood surrounding the Padres new stadium to a corporation. This would be separate from the naming rights to the stadium itself. Currently the neighborhood fits within what is called the East Village. Under Maienchiein’s proposal, it might become the “Preparation H District,” or the “Budweiser Corner” or perhaps “Monsanto Village.”

“If we can generate a significant amount of money, it is going to be in San Diego’s best interest because we are going to save a ton of money for the taxpayers,” Maienschein said, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

“Maybe the councilman could sell naming rights to his business suits instead,” said Gary Ruskin, executive director of Commercial Alert. “That could save the taxpayers the cost of his $54,021 annual salary.”

“If he wants to inflict this indignity upon citizens of his city, shouldn’t he inflict it upon himself first?” Ruskin asked. “He could look like a walking NASCAR racetrack, and thus be a testimony to his own beliefs.”

“We challenge the councilman to lead by example, and to turn his own wardrobe and person into an icon of aggressive commercialism,” Ruskin said.

San Diego is already well-known for its commercialism. In 1999, the City of San Diego struck an exclusive marketing deal with the Pepsi Bottling Group of San Diego. Under the deal only Pepsi soft drinks will be sold on city property in exchange for up to $23.6 million over 12 years.

Ralph Nader founded Commercial Alert in 1998 to keep the commercial culture within its proper sphere, and to prevent it from exploiting children and subverting the higher values of family, community, environmental integrity and democracy.

-30-

PDF Version

NEWS RELEASE
For More Information Contact: Gary Ruskin (202) 588-7746
For Immediate Release: May 2nd, 2001

Sell the Naming Rights to Your Suits, Councilman

Following San Diego City Councilman Brian Maienschein’s proposal to sell naming rights to the city’s 26-block downtown ballpark district, Commercial Alert suggested that the councilman sell naming rights to his business suits to save taxpayers the money from his salary.

Under Councilman Maienchiein’s proposal, the city would sell the name of the neighborhood surrounding the Padres new stadium to a corporation. This would be separate from the naming rights to the stadium itself. Currently the neighborhood fits within what is called the East Village. Under Maienchiein’s proposal, it might become the “Preparation H District,” or the “Budweiser Corner” or perhaps “Monsanto Village.”

“If we can generate a significant amount of money, it is going to be in San Diego’s best interest because we are going to save a ton of money for the taxpayers,” Maienschein said, according to the San Diego Union-Tribune.

“Maybe the councilman could sell naming rights to his business suits instead,” said Gary Ruskin, executive director of Commercial Alert. “That could save the taxpayers the cost of his $54,021 annual salary.”

“If he wants to inflict this indignity upon citizens of his city, shouldn’t he inflict it upon himself first?” Ruskin asked. “He could look like a walking NASCAR racetrack, and thus be a testimony to his own beliefs.”

“We challenge the councilman to lead by example, and to turn his own wardrobe and person into an icon of aggressive commercialism,” Ruskin said.

San Diego is already well-known for its commercialism. In 1999, the City of San Diego struck an exclusive marketing deal with the Pepsi Bottling Group of San Diego. Under the deal only Pepsi soft drinks will be sold on city property in exchange for up to $23.6 million over 12 years.

Ralph Nader founded Commercial Alert in 1998 to keep the commercial culture within its proper sphere, and to prevent it from exploiting children and subverting the higher values of family, community, environmental integrity and democracy.

-30-